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Find the Assumption on GMAT Reading Comprehension (Part 1)

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Blog-MeteorStreams-Part1A couple of years ago, I wrote a small series on the Meteor Stream passage from the free set of practice questions that comes with the GMATPrep® software. A student recently mentioned how useful he found the discussion regarding how to handle all the technical language in a science passage, and I realized that there’s more we can do with this passage! Read more

How to Tackle Every Single GMAT Problem (Seriously!) – Part 4

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Blog-Tackle-Pt4Welcome to the fourth installment of our series: how to tackle every problem on the GMAT. If you’re joining in the middle, go back and learn about the set of principles that tie together everything we need to do on the GMAT. Then work your way back to this installment.

Here’s our framework again:

228 - Q Process 3

I finished off part 3 with the following GMATPrep® problem from the free exams. Let’s use the SC process to answer it now. Read more

GMAT Data Sufficiency: Ratio Stories – Part 2

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Social-RatioStoriesRecently, we took a look at a story problem dealing with ratios, and I finished up by giving you a second problem to test your skills. How did you do?

If you haven’t already, try the GMATPrep® problem below and then we’ll talk about it. Give yourself about 2 minutes. Go! Read more

How to Tackle Every Single GMAT Problem (Seriously!) – Part 3

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Blog-Tackle-Pt3Welcome to part 3 of our series on how to answer every single GMAT problem you’ll ever see. :) If you haven’t already read the earlier installments, start with part 1 and work your way back to me.

This time, we’re going to test out the process with a GMATPrep® Sentence Correction question from the free exams. Here you go:
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GMAT Data Sufficiency Ratio Stories — Part 1

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Social-RatioStories

How are you with story problems? Most math concepts can be presented in story form on the test and the GMAT test writers do like to get wordy with us. You’ve got a double task: you have to translate the words into math and then you still have to do the math! How can we get through these as efficiently as possible?

Try the GMATPrep® problem below and then we’ll talk about it. Give yourself about 2 minutes. Go!

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How to Tackle Every Single GMAT Problem (Seriously!) – Part 2

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Last time, I introduced you to a set of principles that tie together everything we need to do on the GMAT.

Blog-Tackle-Pt2

If you haven’t already read that article, go ahead and do so now.

Here’s our framework again:

228 - Q Process 3

Today, we’re going to try this out on a Data Sufficiency problem.

Try this DS problem from the GMATPrep® free exams.
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The Importance of Getting to No on the GMAT — Part 2

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Last time, we talked about how crucial it is to develop the instinct to go for the “No” when taking the GMAT. If you haven’t read the first installment, do so right now, then come back here to learn more.

I left you with this GMATPrep® problem from the free exams.

“*If 0 <r< 1 <s< 2, which of the following must be less than 1?

“I. r/s

“II. rs

“III. sr

“(A) I only

“(B) II only

“(C) III only

“(D) I and II

“(E) I and III”

Let’s talk about it now!

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Manhattan Prep secures endorsement from Dr. Lawrence Rudner, leading GMAT authority

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Larry Explains 2I have some very exciting news to announce.

For the past several months, we have engaged Dr. Lawrence Rudner, former Chief Psychometrician of the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC, the makers of the GMAT®), to review our practice tests. Dr. Rudner is one of the world’s leading experts in item response theory, the testing principle on which the GMAT is based. He is the definitive authority on the GMAT examination.

And here’s what he has to say about Manhattan Prep’s practice exams:

“I conducted an extensive examination of student data for all of the Manhattan Prep test questions and I was very impressed. I can attest to the fact that very high percentages of Quant and Verbal items have excellent psychometric properties. I can further attest that Manhattan Prep’s GMAT practice exams do an excellent job of predicting a student’s score on the actual GMAT examination. Manhattan Prep’s GMAT practice exams can help you accurately gauge when you’re ready to achieve your goal score on the real test.”

Lawrence M. Rudner, PhD, MBA

In short, our tests do “an excellent job of predicting” your score on the real GMAT. That’s great news!

I am particularly excited about the fact that our CATs were so strong that Dr. Rudner offered his endorsement without requiring us to change a single thing. Going into the review, we had thought that we would be given a required list of changes before he could give his seal of approval.

I do have to add a caveat: nothing is perfect and not everyone scores on the real test exactly what they scored on our test (or any practice test). No standardized test is that precise, including the real GMAT. There are also other factors that can negatively affect certain students, such as anxiety (you know your practice tests don’t really count) or mental fatigue (don’t study for 6 hours the day before the real exam!).

Caveat over. In general, you can trust our exams to help you know when you’re ready to get in there and take the real thing. I already felt that way before, but now I can say it with conviction, because Dr. Rudner has confirmed the accuracy of our exams.

I have to give a shout-out to all of our instructors who have worked so diligently on our exams over the years—you know who you are. We literally would not be having this conversation right now if not for your hard work and dedication to making our materials the best. Thank you for your love of teaching and your complete fascination with the GMAT. I’m proud to call you colleagues and friends.

And back to our students: Go forth and study! You can beat this test!

The Importance of Getting to No on the GMAT — Part 1

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Social-No-Pt1Recently, a colleague of mine shared this very interesting puzzle published by the New York Times. (Thanks, Ceilidh!)

Go ahead and try it. I’ll wait. After you’ve tried the puzzle, you can read the short article that goes with it.

What did you learn about how humans tend to think? More important, what did you learn about how you think?

That tendency to look for the no, or to try to disprove something, is a trait shared by scientists, devil’s advocates, and great standardized test takers. You can learn to make this your natural reaction, too!

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How to Tackle Every Single GMAT Problem (Seriously!) — Part 1

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Wouldn’t it be nice to have one common thread among all GMAT problems you’ll ever do, something you do no matter what kind of problem or content area is being tested?

Blog-Tackle-Pt1

I’m here to answer your prayers. :)

Okay, obviously, there are many things you’re going to need to learn and practice in order to get a great GMAT score—these isn’t literally just one thing to learn. But it turns out that there is one set of principles tying together everything we need to do on the GMAT.

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