Articles published in August 2013

Manhattan Prep’s GRE Social Venture Scholar Program

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Manhattan Prep is offering special full tuition scholarships for up to 4 individuals per year (1 per quarter) who will be selected as part of Manhattan Prep’s GRE Social Venture Scholars program. This program provides the selected scholars with free admission into one of Manhattan Prep’s GRE live online Complete Courses (an $890 value).

These competitive scholarships are offered to individuals who (1) currently work full-time in an organization that promotes positive social change, (2) plan to use their master’s degree to work in a public, not-for-profit, or other venture with a social-change oriented mission, and (3) demonstrate clear financial need. The Social Venture Scholars can enroll in any live online preparation course taught by one of Manhattan Prep’s expert instructors within one year of winning the scholarship.

The deadline our next application period is 9/6.

More details and how you can apply can be found here.

The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – August 26, 2013

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new GRE Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

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See the answer choices and submit your pick over on our Challenge Problem page.

Free GRE Events This Week: August 26- September 1

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Here are the free GRE events we’re holding this week (All times local unless otherwise specified):

free

8/26/13– Online- Mondays With Jen– 9:00PM – 10:30PM (EDT)

8/28/13– New York, NY- Free Trial Class– 6:30PM – 9:30PM

8/29/13– Santa Monica, CA- Free Trial Class– 6:30PM – 9:30PM

Looking for more free events? Check out our Free Events Listing Page.

Friday Links: Best Majors for GRE Scores, The Admissions Process, & More!

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its-friday2Happy Friday! Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite grad school news and tips from the week:

Succeed as a Nontraditional Grad School Applicant (U.S. News Education)

It might seem like most graduate students come fresh from a bachelor’s degree, but that’s not the case.

Best Majors for GRE Scores in 2013: Philosophy Dominates (Buzz Blog)

ETS has grouped average scores by the test-takers’ intended graduate major, inevitably contributing to the bragging rights of “major” elitists.

Find The Right Graduate School To Avoid Attrition (Graduate Guide)

Just as many individuals are known to leave college before they can finish their undergraduate studies, graduate students sometimes abandon academia before graduation.

Hate the GMAT? 7 Reasons to Take the GRE Instead (Business Because)

You now have options and generally speaking, there are good reasons to take the GRE instead of the GMAT.

Take an Inside Look At Graduate Admissions (U.S. News Education)

Former admissions dean at Columbia University, Northwestern University, Wheaton College, and University of Chicago Booth School of Business shares insider knowledge about the admissions process.

Did we miss your favorite article from the week? Let us know what you’ve been reading in the comments or tweet @ManhattanPrep.

The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – August 19, 2013

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new GRE Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

If , then what is the value of ?

See the answer choices and submit your pick over on our Challenge Problem page.

Friday Links: Grad School Application Process, Productivity Tip, & More!

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Stack of newspapersHappy Friday! Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite grad school news and tips from the week:

Manage the U.S. Graduate School Application Process (U.S. News Education)

Stay on top of admissions tasks and deadlines even after submitting to U.S. graduate schools.

Carve Out a Place to Work (About.com Graduate School)

The simplest thing that you can do to ensure your productivity this academic year is to create a study space that is used exclusively for your work.

Fueling Grad School, from the Application to the Dissertation (Grad Hacker)

Current grad student at the University of Michigan talks about food habits that will improve your grad student life and health, from the first year to the last one.

How to Decide if Grad School Is Right For You (Huffington Post College)

Should you go to graduate school? While no one can offer a concrete answer, it helps to ask yourself a few questions to see whether you’re truly ready for graduate study or if an advanced degree will really help your situation.

Did we miss your favorite article from the week? Let us know what you’ve been reading in the comments or tweet @ManhattanPrep.

Parlez vous Mathematique

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“Many a true word is said in jest.”—I don’t know, but I heard it from my mother.

Once upon a time in America, when I was a boy, my father, an engineer, said to me, “You can make numbers do anything you want them to do.”  This was the beginning of my cynicism.math language  But never mind that.  My father was fluent in four languages: English, German, French, and Algebra.  And his comment relied on the fact that most people can’t read Algebra.  Teaching GRE classes, I combat the fact that many people can’t read Algebra.  Because, like my father, the GRE exploits that weakness.  Thus, for many, preparing for the quantitative portion of the GRE is akin to studying a foreign language.  (Yes, I know that even many native speakers feel that preparing for the verbal portion of the GRE is also akin to studying a foreign language.  But that’s a different topic.)  In any case, you want to make your Algebra as fluent as your French. . .yes, for most of you, that was one of those jokes.

I know that some of you disagreed with the above and feel that the problem is an inability to understand math.  But that’s not true, at least on the level necessary to succeed on the GRE.  If you really didn’t have enough synapses, they wouldn’t let you out without a keeper—because you couldn’t tip, or comparison shop, or count your change.  It’s a literacy problem.  Think of our GRE math units.  Truthfully, the algebra unit is often a death march.  By the end, as country folk say, I often feel like I’m whipping dead horses.  On the other hand, the word problem unit concerning probability and combinations, putatively* a more advanced topic, usually goes really well.  Why?  Because folks can read the words and understand their meaning.  Conversely, folks just stare at the algebraic symbols as if they were hieroglyphics.  The problem is that putting a Rosetta Stone in the book bag would make it weigh too much. . .kidding.  But if you can’t read the hieroglyphics, the mummy will get you—just like in the movies.

It really is a literacy issue and should be approached in that fashion.  You still don’t believe me?  You want specific examples?  I got examples, a pro and a con.  On the affirmative side, I once worked one on one with a man who came to me because his math was in shreds.  Because he couldn’t read what the symbols were saying.  Partly because his mother had once said, “Your sister is the one that’s good at math.”  As far as the GRE is concerned, she was wrong, and so was your mother, if she said that.  Anyway, one day I gave him a high level word problem concerning average daily balances on a credit card.  He looked at it for about 30 seconds, and he didn’t write anything on his scrap paper.  Then he turned to me and said the answer was blah blah.  And he was right.  I looked at him and said, “How did you do that?  You’re not that good.”  (Yes, this is also an example of how mean I am to private students.)  But—and here’s the real punch line—he said, “It was about debt; I understood what the words meant.”  And there you go.

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The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – August 12, 2013

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

James is closer in age to Gwen than to Lucille.  Gwen is between 30 and 40 years old, inclusive.  Lucille is less than 70 years old, and her age in years has exactly three prime factors.  Which of the following could be James’ age, in years? Read more

Free GRE Events This Week: August 12- August 18

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Here are the free GRE events we’re holding this week (All times local unless otherwise specified):free

8/12/13– Online- Mondays With Jen– 9:00PM-10:30PM (EST)

8/13/13– Boston, MA – Free Trial Class– 6:30PM – 9:30PM (EDT)

Looking for more free events? Check out our Free Events Listing Page.

Friday Links: Humor in Grad School, Preparing for the Fall Semester, & More!

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fridayHappy Friday! Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite grad school news and tips from the week:

Best GRE Books (Test Study Guides)

Test Study Guides shares their hand-picked list of the best GRE prep books and explains why these are the most effective study guides for the test.

How International Graduate Students Can Find U.S. Housing (U.S. News Education)

Finding housing from far away can be intimidating, but there are resources to help international students in their search.

Five Reasons Why a Sense of Humor is Crucial to Grad School Success (Grad Hacker)

A sense of humor is crucial to grad school survival, says Grad Hacker. Check out the number of reasons for why this is true.

What to Consider When Considering Graduate School (About.com Graduate School)

The summer months – and the break from classes – gives many students the opportunity to think about the future.

Forge Connections Early with Graduate School Professors (U.S. News Education)

Pursuing an independent study is a good way to get to know a professor better and could lead to being asked to co-author a research paper.

From Summer to Semester (Grad Hacker)

Taking the last few weeks of summer to reflect, organize, plan, and anticipate can help to put the fall semester of grad school into perspective.

Did we miss your favorite article from the week? Let us know what you’ve been reading in the comments or tweet @ManhattanPrep.