Articles published in GMAT Strategies

Know the GMAT Code: Interest Rate GMAT Problems

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Know the GMAT Code: Interest Rate GMAT Problems by Stacey Koprince

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


I’m excited about the problem I have to share with you today in the latest installment of our Know the Code series. Interest rate GMAT problems can be extremely annoying—you might find yourself spending 4 minutes and still having to guess in the end. So your first decision is whether you even want to tackle these kinds of problems in the first place.

But there are some things you can learn that could make answering interest rate GMAT problems a lot less irritating. Try out this Integrated Reasoning (IR) Two-Part problem from the GMATPrep® free practice exams. (Note: This one is an IR question, but I could absolutely see them testing the same principle on a Quant problem.) Read more

Help! I Can’t Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 3)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Help! I Can't Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 3) by Chelsey Cooley

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


In the previous articles in this series, we developed a critical skill for GMAT probability and combinatorics problems: listing out cases. Let’s start by taking another look at the practice problem from the end of the last article. Read more

GMAT Grammar: Using Nor Without Neither

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: Using Nor Without Neither by Emily Madan

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


This is the first in what I hope will be many student-question inspired posts. Allyson from Philadelphia was wondering whether “nor” had to be paired with “neither” or whether it could be used on its own. The answer was far more complex than expected, so here it is. If you have an idea for a GMAT grammar blog post, or just have a question that you want answered, email me at emadan@manhattanprep.com.

To begin, you’ll need to understand the essentials of parallelism. You can get in-depth coverage of parallelism in our Sentence Correction Strategy Guide, but here are the basics. Two (or more) things in a list have to be both structural and logically parallel. Let’s start with the positive form: either/or. Read more

How to Handle 3-Group Overlapping Sets on the GMAT

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - How to Handle 3-Group Overlapping Sets on the GMAT by Reed Arnold

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Most overlapping sets on the GMAT have two distinct groups. Students take French and/or Spanish (or neither), pianists play either classical and/or jazz (or neither), people like either QDoba and/or Baja Fresh (definitely neither. Chipotle, please)—and for these situations, the familiar, double-set matrix approach works best. Read more

Practicing Sets of GMAT Problems: Mimic the Real Test (Part 3 of 3)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Practicing Sets of GMAT Problems: Mimic the Real Test (Part 3 of 3) by Stacey Koprince

Guess what? You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free—we’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Welcome to part 3 of our series! If you haven’t seen the earlier installments yet, please start with part 1 and work your way back to me here.

We’ve talked about how to create sets of GMAT problems and how to set your time limit. We haven’t yet discussed what you need to learn from one of these sets before you try another one. Read more

Help! I Can’t Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 2)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Help! I Can't Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 2) by Chelsey Cooley

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


In the previous article in this series, we introduced two big ideas about GMAT probability and combinatorics:

  1. Most people find them counterintuitive.
  2. The best way to get past that is to list the possibilities.

In this article, we’ll focus more on #2. How do you list out the possibilities in a GMAT probability or combinatorics problem? Let’s try it on a simple probability problem. Read more

How to Hack GMAT Reading Comprehension: Think Like a Lawyer!

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - How to Hack GMAT Reading Comprehension: Think Like a Lawyer! by Ceilidh Erickson

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


After working with thousands of students, I’ll admit: Reading Comprehension is my least favorite subject to teach. Why? Because unlike Quant or grammar, it doesn’t have concrete rules to apply, so it can be harder to find ways to help when students are struggling.

I have found, though, that many students who struggle with GMAT Reading Comprehension aren’t actually struggling with the “reading” or the “comprehension” part (unless they struggle with English skills generally). No, the passages – though dense and often boring – are mostly ok. It’s answering the questions that’s a struggle!

RC questions can seem vague, and the answer choices can feel like a sphinx’s riddle. Often 2 or 3 answers choices may seem equally right, or maybe none of them seem right! So what should you do? Read more

Should I Get a GMAT Tutor?

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Should I Get a GMAT Tutor? by Elaine Loh

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


“Do you think I should get a GMAT tutor? Is it worth it?” As a GMAT teacher, I hear these questions often and I’ve realized that they tend to come at three specific times during class. I have a few hypotheses as to why these questions come up at these particular times, and some suggestions for you if you share these concerns. Read more

Practicing Sets of GMAT Problems: Mimic the Real Test (Part 2 of 3)

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SK 406 - Practicing Sets of GMAT Problems: Mimic the Real Test (Part 2 of 3) by Stacey Koprince

Guess what? You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free—we’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Last time, we talked about all of the basics of creating practice problem sets. Today, we’re going to talk about how to create larger sets that really mimic the GMAT testing experience. (If you haven’t read the first part yet, do start there.)

What are my goals for these larger sets of GMAT problems?

When you’ve made it through your primary review of all study materials (all question types and content areas), you’re ready to start doing larger problem sets: 8, 12, 16. (I’ll tell you later why these are all multiples of 4.)

Your goal is two-fold:

—Test (and continue to build) your skills on all this stuff you’ve been studying.

—Practice your overall business-decision-making skills (in other words, practice under conditions that mimic the real GMAT as closely as possible). Read more

Help! I Can’t Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 1)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Help! I Can't Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 1) by Chelsey Cooley

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


There’s a classic brain teaser called the Monty Hall problem. It’s named after the host of an old-timey TV game show, who used it to confound contestants. He’d present each contestant with three closed doors. Behind one door was a new car, and behind the other two doors were goats.

Monty invited the player to pick one of the three doors. Whichever door the player chose, Monty would then open a different one, revealing a goat, not the car. Then, he would offer the player a choice. If the player wanted, he could switch doors, picking the other unopened door. Or, he could stick with the door he picked in the first place. Whichever decision he made, he would win the prize behind the door he chose. Read more