Articles published in Challenge Problem

Help! I Can’t Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 3)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Help! I Can't Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 3) by Chelsey Cooley

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


In the previous articles in this series, we developed a critical skill for GMAT probability and combinatorics problems: listing out cases. Let’s start by taking another look at the practice problem from the end of the last article. Read more

Help! I Can’t Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 2)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Help! I Can't Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 2) by Chelsey Cooley

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


In the previous article in this series, we introduced two big ideas about GMAT probability and combinatorics:

  1. Most people find them counterintuitive.
  2. The best way to get past that is to list the possibilities.

In this article, we’ll focus more on #2. How do you list out the possibilities in a GMAT probability or combinatorics problem? Let’s try it on a simple probability problem. Read more

Help! I Can’t Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 1)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Help! I Can't Handle GMAT Probability and Combinatorics (Part 1) by Chelsey Cooley

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


There’s a classic brain teaser called the Monty Hall problem. It’s named after the host of an old-timey TV game show, who used it to confound contestants. He’d present each contestant with three closed doors. Behind one door was a new car, and behind the other two doors were goats.

Monty invited the player to pick one of the three doors. Whichever door the player chose, Monty would then open a different one, revealing a goat, not the car. Then, he would offer the player a choice. If the player wanted, he could switch doors, picking the other unopened door. Or, he could stick with the door he picked in the first place. Whichever decision he made, he would win the prize behind the door he chose. Read more

Here’s How to do GMAT Unit Conversions Like a Pro

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blog-metricsSometimes the whole point of a specific GMAT problem is to convert between miles and kilometers, or meters and centimeters. In other problems, you’ll need to do a unit conversion as part of a longer solution. It’s easy to mess up unit conversions, and the GMAT writers know this — they include them on the test in order to test your level of organization and your ability to double-check your work. Here’s how to add fast unit conversions to your repertoire of skills.   Read more

Manhattan Prep’s GMAT® study app is now available!

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I am very excited to announce that our new GMAT® study app is available on both iOS and Android!


Download now!

iOS

Android


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Monthly GMAT Challenge Problem Showdown: January 13, 2013

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challenge problem
We invite you to test your GMAT knowledge for a chance to win! The second week of every month, we will post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that month’s drawing for free Manhattan GMAT prep materials. Tell your friends to get out their scrap paper and start solving!

Here is this month’s problem:

If pq, and r are different positive integers such that p + q + r = 6, what is the value of x ?

(1) The average of xp and xq is xr.

(2) The average of xp and xr is not xq.

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GMAT Challenge Problem Showdown: December 23, 2013

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challenge problem
We invite you to test your GMAT knowledge for a chance to win! Each week, we will post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for a free Manhattan GMAT Prep item. Tell your friends to get out their scrap paper and start solving!

Here is this week’s problem:

A pharmacy must purchase a set of n metal weights, each weighing an integer number of grams, such that all integer weights from 1 to 300 grams (inclusive) can be made with a combination of one or more of the weights. What is the minimum number of metal weights that the pharmacy must purchase?

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GMAT Challenge Problem Showdown: December 16, 2013

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challenge problem
We invite you to test your GMAT knowledge for a chance to win! Each week, we will post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for a free Manhattan GMAT Prep item. Tell your friends to get out their scrap paper and start solving!

Here is this week’s problem:

A set of n identical triangles with angle x° and two sides of length 1 is assembled to make a parallelogram (if n is even) or a trapezoid (if n is odd), as shown. Is the perimeter of the parallelogram or trapezoid less than 10?

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GMAT Challenge Problem Showdown: December 9, 2013

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challenge problem
We invite you to test your GMAT knowledge for a chance to win! Each week, we will post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for a free Manhattan GMAT Prep item. Tell your friends to get out their scrap paper and start solving!

Here is this week’s problem:

Can you find the most efficient way to solve this problem?

Gita, Hussain, Inge, Jeong, Karen, and Leila are seated in a row of six chairs. How many seating arrangements are possible if Gita cannot sit next to Inge and Jeong must sit next to Leila?

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GMAT Challenge Problem Showdown: December 2, 2013

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challenge problem
We invite you to test your GMAT knowledge for a chance to win! Each week, we will post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for a free Manhattan GMAT Prep item. Tell your friends to get out their scrap paper and start solving!

Here is this week’s problem:

An isosceles triangle with one angle of 120° is inscribed in a circle of radius 2. This triangle is rotated 90° about the center of the circle. What is the total area covered by the triangle throughout this movement, from starting point to final resting point?

(A) 
(B) 
(C) 
(D) 
(E) 

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