Articles published in Sentence Correction

GMAT Grammar: Using Nor Without Neither

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: Using Nor Without Neither by Emily Madan

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


This is the first in what I hope will be many student-question inspired posts. Allyson from Philadelphia was wondering whether “nor” had to be paired with “neither” or whether it could be used on its own. The answer was far more complex than expected, so here it is. If you have an idea for a GMAT grammar blog post, or just have a question that you want answered, email me at emadan@manhattanprep.com.

To begin, you’ll need to understand the essentials of parallelism. You can get in-depth coverage of parallelism in our Sentence Correction Strategy Guide, but here are the basics. Two (or more) things in a list have to be both structural and logically parallel. Let’s start with the positive form: either/or. Read more

GMAT Grammar: Changing the Subject

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: Changing the Subject by Emily Madan

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Subject-verb agreement is fundamental to correct sentence construction. It’s commonly tested on the GMAT, but is overlooked far too often. Today, we’re going to focus on the subject of the sentence in GMAT grammar.

The subject is the actor of the sentence. It performs the action described by the verb. For simplicity’s sake, I’m going to use “subject” to mean the main subject of the sentence, used in an independent clause, though, of course, a sentence can contain multiple actors/subjects. For example: Read more

GMAT Sentence Correction: Spot the Trap! (Part 2)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Sentence Correction: Spot the Trap! (Part 2) by Stacey Koprince

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Last time, we talked about how to read for meaning and spot redundancy traps on GMAT Sentence Correction.

I’ve got another trappy SC for you; this one is from the GMATPrep® free exams. Go for it! Read more

GMAT Grammar: Pronoun Rules

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: Pronoun Rules by Emily Madan

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Possessive Pronouns

Pronouns are nifty little tools for consolidating your writing. Instead of repeating a noun over and over within the same sentence, you can simply replace it with a pronoun. The meaning stays clear and the message is concise. Compare the following sentences: Read more

GMAT Sentence Correction: Spot the Trap! (Part 1)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Sentence Correction: Spot the Trap! (Part 1) by Stacey Koprince

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


If you’re a non-native English speaker, you know that you’ll need to be extra careful with idioms and other constructions that native speakers just “know.” If you’re a native speaker, though, don’t think that you have a huge advantage! The GMAT test writers know the kinds of common errors that have crept into spoken language, and they’re going to try to trap you, too!

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GMAT Mastery: Manage Time and Avoid Traps on Critical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension

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SK 366 - GMAT Mastery: Manage Time and Avoid Traps on Critical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension by Stacey KoprinceDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


On Verbal, we’re asked for the “best” answer—not the “objectively correct” answer that we need to find on Quant—so it can be really easy to fall for a tempting trap, especially on Critical Reasoning (CR) and Reading Comprehension (RC).

Learn to work super-systematically, though, and you’ll navigate through those tempting traps to land on the right answer. (Well…most of the time, anyway. :)) Here’s what to do. Read more

The GMAT Official Guides 2017 edition – Part 4

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - New GMAT Official Guides 2017 Released! - Part 4 by Stacey KoprinceDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Welcome to the fourth installment of our series on the new Official Guides for GMAT® Review (2017 edition). If you haven’t seen the earlier installments yet, start here and work your way back to me.

I know that some people have already worked through the 2016 editions of the books and want to know which questions in the 2017 editions are the new ones. I’ve got the scoop for you! Read more

The GMAT Official Guides 2017 edition – Part 3

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - New GMAT Official Guides 2017 Released! - Part 3 by Stacey KoprinceDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


They’re alive! (Cough. Er.) Well, they’re published anyway: the new Official Guide books are here! In Part 1 and Part 2, we talked about the Quant portions of the new Official Guides, aka the OGs. It’s time to dive into Verbal. We’ll be talking about the verbal sections of The Official Guide for GMAT® Review 2017, aka the OG or the big book, as well as The Official Guide for GMAT Verbal Review 2017, aka the verbal review or the verbal supplement. Read more

GMAT Grammar Biweekly: The Post That Explains “That”

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Biweekly Grammar Tips to Help You Ace GMAT Veral: The Post That Explains That by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


The word “that” is one of the most flexible words that the GMAT tests. It can take several roles and could easily be misused. More commonly, it serves as a red herring that forces readers to stop and think about the wrong things. That said, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty of how “that” can be used and why. Read more

GMAT Grammar: The GMAT’s Passive Voice Policy

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: The GMAT's Passive Voice Policy by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


In short; passive voice is acceptable on the GMAT.

If only it were that easy. Read more