Articles tagged "gmat grammar"

GMAT Grammar: Changing the Subject

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: Changing the Subject by Emily Madan

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Subject-verb agreement is fundamental to correct sentence construction. It’s commonly tested on the GMAT, but is overlooked far too often. Today, we’re going to focus on the subject of the sentence in GMAT grammar.

The subject is the actor of the sentence. It performs the action described by the verb. For simplicity’s sake, I’m going to use “subject” to mean the main subject of the sentence, used in an independent clause, though, of course, a sentence can contain multiple actors/subjects. For example: Read more

GMAT Sentence Correction: Spot the Trap! (Part 2)

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Sentence Correction: Spot the Trap! (Part 2) by Stacey Koprince

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Last time, we talked about how to read for meaning and spot redundancy traps on GMAT Sentence Correction.

I’ve got another trappy SC for you; this one is from the GMATPrep® free exams. Go for it! Read more

GMAT Grammar: Pronoun Rules

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: Pronoun Rules by Emily Madan

Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Possessive Pronouns

Pronouns are nifty little tools for consolidating your writing. Instead of repeating a noun over and over within the same sentence, you can simply replace it with a pronoun. The meaning stays clear and the message is concise. Compare the following sentences: Read more

GMAT Grammar Biweekly: The Post That Explains “That”

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - Biweekly Grammar Tips to Help You Ace GMAT Veral: The Post That Explains That by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


The word “that” is one of the most flexible words that the GMAT tests. It can take several roles and could easily be misused. More commonly, it serves as a red herring that forces readers to stop and think about the wrong things. That said, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty of how “that” can be used and why. Read more

GMAT Grammar: The GMAT’s Passive Voice Policy

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar: The GMAT's Passive Voice Policy by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


In short; passive voice is acceptable on the GMAT.

If only it were that easy. Read more

GMAT Grammar Biweekly: Noun Modifiers

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar Biweekly: Noun Modifiers by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


If you’ve been following these posts, you already have one kind of  noun modifier safely stashed away – opening modifiers. Let’s expand your repertoire using the same sentence: Read more

GMAT Grammar Biweekly: Opening Modifiers

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Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - GMAT Grammar Biweekly: Opening Modifiers by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Modifiers can seem overwhelming. They have lots of rules, impact meaning, and come in different kinds, each of which is restrictive in different ways. So why not throw modifiers out the window? They are the grammatical spice of life! Consider this simple sentence:

The dog ran down the street.

Basic. Boring. Factual, but unimportant. Now compare it this sentence: Read more

GMAT Grammar Biweekly – Participles: Everything You Never Wanted to Know

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GMAT Grammer Biweekly - Participles: Everything You Never Wanted to Know by Emily MadanDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Participles. Just the word is enough to inspire dread in the heart of most GMAT Test Takers. Let’s break down what they are and why you should care. Read more

GMAT Grammar Biweekly: Adverbial Modifiers

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Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - GMAT Grammar Biweekly: Adverbial Modifiers


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Have you been following our grammar tips series? We’ve already talked about opening modifiers and noun modifiers. We’re almost done with this much-feared topic. If you’re still having problems, it’s probably with adverbial modifiers.

These can be the most overwhelming, so let’s break them down now. Back to our favorite modifier-riddled sentence:

Barking ferociously, the dog, which was known to be vicious, ran down the street, chasing the boy who had been poking at it just moments before.

An adverbial modifier is something that describes almost anything in the world that is not a noun. There’s actually a one-word adverbial modifier in our ferocious dog sentence (or, put far more simply, an adverb). Go back and see if you can find it. Read more

GMAT Grammar Weekly: FANBOYS

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blog-fanboysJoin us every other week for a commonly-tested grammar factoid that will improve both your accuracy and your confidence on GMAT Sentence Correction. 📖📝 Read more