Articles tagged "gmat how to study"

Two Minutes of GMAT Quant: A Breakdown – Part 1

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blog-minutes-pt1Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Two minutes is not a huge amount of time. Yet if you want to finish the entire GMAT Quant section in 75 minutes, two minutes is about all you have to solve each problem. Don’t interpret that to mean you just have to go quickly or skip important steps like checking your work. Instead, seek out a more efficient process for dealing with GMAT problems.

Better yet, read along as I detail an efficient process for dealing with your two minutes. Read more

GMAT Sentence Correction: What can the underline tell you?

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blog-underlineI ran across the GMAT problem below when I was reviewing a GMATPrep® test that I took a while back, and as soon as I saw it, I knew I needed to share it with you. There are some really intriguing aspects to this one. Read more

First Glance Flopping on GMAT Sentence Correction? Try This.

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GMAT Sentence Correction StrategiesYou know the first step of GMAT Sentence Correction is the first glance. (If you don’t, check out chapter 1 of our SC Strategy Guide.) So, dutifully, you start every SC problem with a quick look at the answers. There are some differences. Then you power through the reading and look for issues in the sentence as written.

This is a first glance flop. You do it, but it’s not helpful. Let’s add a bit more purpose to what can be the most important step of the sentence correction process. I’ll show you some answer choices to practice on in a moment, but let’s remind ourselves of some of the basics. Read more

Just Started Studying for the GMAT? Here’s Where to Begin

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blog-beginWhen you first look at the resources available to get you through the GMAT, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Should you read through all the strategy guides? Complete every Official Guide problem you can find? Sign up for every workshop? Let’s breakdown your options and take this step by step. Read more

Here’s why you should interleave your GMAT studies (and what that means)

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Blog-InterleaveRecently, I wrote a post about how to get the most out of Official Guide (OG) problems during your studies. In that article, I discussed the concept of Interleaving your studies and I’ve got more to say on this strategy that’s of crucial importance to your studies.

What is Interleaving?

In a nutshell, interleaving is a way of mixing up your studies. For example, let’s say that you’re about to start studying the Fractions chapter of our Fractions, Decimals, & Percents (FDP) Strategy Guide. It’s only 8 pages long, so you should just read the whole thing straight through, right? (Note: if you actually have this guide,  pull it out right now and follow along below.) Read more

How many GMAT practice tests should you take?

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How many GMAT practice tests should you take while studying for the test? GMAT expert Jonathan Schneider weighs in.  Read more

How to Tackle Every Single GMAT Problem (Seriously!) – Part 5

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Blog-Tackle-Pt5Welcome to part 5 of our series on how to answer every single GMAT problem you’ll ever see. :) If you haven’t already read the earlier installments, start with part 1 and work your way back to me.

Last time, I left you with a Critical Reasoning question from the free questions that come with the GMATPrep® software. Let’s talk about it! Read more

How to Tackle Every Single GMAT Problem (Seriously!) – Part 4

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Blog-Tackle-Pt4Welcome to the fourth installment of our series: how to tackle every problem on the GMAT. If you’re joining in the middle, go back and learn about the set of principles that tie together everything we need to do on the GMAT. Then work your way back to this installment.

Here’s our framework again:

228 - Q Process 3

I finished off part 3 with the following GMATPrep® problem from the free exams. Let’s use the SC process to answer it now. Read more

Should I take a GMAT class or study on my own?

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Can you learn everything you need to know in order to ace the GMAT on your own? Read more

GMAT Prep: Stop Wasting My Time

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gmat-study-tipsHave you ever worked with someone who inevitably managed to come up with things to do that were a complete waste of time? Maybe it was an insecure boss who was never confident about what he was doing, so he went for the “everything and the kitchen sink” approach to generating deliverables in the last few days before the deadline. Or maybe it was a fellow student on a group project, someone so diligent (cough, cough) that she wanted to turn in a 20-page report when the teacher suggested 10 pages (and actually specified a 12-page limit).

You know who I’m talking about, right? We’ve all run across these situations in our academic or working lives. You want to be polite…but you also want to get your work done and not waste time on activities that don’t really help you reach the overall goal.

The GMAT is trying to waste your time

Okay, the test writers are not literally sitting there cackling and saying, “How can we get them to waste their lives?!?” But the overall sentiment still holds because of the way that the GMAT is constructed. You already know the classic “If you get something right, they give you something harder” pattern, right?

Well, at some point, that “something harder” is going to be something that isn’t worth your time. You’re probably not going to get it right no matter what you do. Even if you do, you’re going to use up valuable time that you could be using on other problems.

Most important of all, you’re going to be using up your finite brain energy on something that probably isn’t going to pay off. How many times in your life have you crashed towards the end of a test or a long day at work because your brain just couldn’t keep going any longer? The GMAT is a “where you end is what you get” test: if you crash before the end of the section, your score will suffer greatly.

This is basically no different than that co-worker who’s trying to get you to build a marketing presentation when the client has specifically requested that you analyze the pros and cons of acquiring a competitor. Tomorrow at the client meeting, it won’t matter how good your intentions were. Your client is going to be mad that you wasted time on something that doesn’t actually help them.

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