Articles published in Quantitative Comparison

Top 10 GRE Quantitative Comparisons Tips

by

Top 10 GRE Quantitative Comparisons Tips

Good news: GRE Quantitative Comparisons aren’t like anything you had to do in math class. Mastering these tricky problems is a quick way to improve your GRE Quant score without a ton of computation. Get started with our 10 best GRE Quantitative Comparisons tips! Then, once you’re done reading, check out the GRE Math Strategy Guide for even more. Read more

To D or Not to D on the GRE — That is the Question

by

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - To D or Not to D on the GRE — That is the Question by Tom Anderson

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. Crazy, right? Check out our upcoming courses here.


If you’ve ever taken a GRE, you’ve encountered something like this:

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - To D or Not to D on the GRE — That is the Question by Tom Anderson

This is a good ole GRE Quantitative Comparison question—a “QC” for short. They’re always the first questions you see on the test. And they always have the same answer choices. Read more

GRE Quantitative Comparisons: The Equal-Different Method

by

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - GRE Quantitative Comparisons: The Equal-Different Method by Daniel Yudkin

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. Ready to take the plunge? Check out our upcoming courses here.


There are many different approaches to tackling GRE Quantitative Comparisons problems. One of my favorites is something that, in my opinion, generally doesn’t get talked about enough. This method is for people who feel very comfortable with the basics of quantitative comparisons, and have a decent handle on mental math. When executed properly, it can save you a great amount of time on the test, thus giving you the opportunity to solve other problems. It also can help avoid making silly errors by reducing the number of paper-and-pencil calculations you have to do. This method is called the Equal-Different, or E-D, method. Read more