Manhattan Prep GRE Blog

Flashcard Sneak Peek: Albeit and Other Conjunctions

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Take a sneak peek into Manhattan Prep’s 500 Essential Words and 500 Advanced Words GRE flashcard sets!

You know what we’ve noticed? There are all kinds of words that people don’t know, but rarely look up, because those words aren’t “vocabulary words.” Hmmn. Actually, those words — generally conjunctions, prepositions, and adverbs — tend to be pivotal in understanding the meaning of a sentence! Check out just one of the kinds of words we’re talking about:

Are you clear on moreover, nonetheless, incidentally, whence, whereas, notwithstanding, via, apropos, per, and ergo?

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The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – March 5th, 2012

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

The inverted cone pictured below is initially filled to height h0 with a volume of 1,000Ï€ of water. 60 percent of the water is drained from the cone and the water level falls to height h1. For a cone with radius r and height h, volume = .

Note: Figure Not Drawn to Scale

Quantity A

Quantity B
0.4

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A Bit of Grad School Related Fun

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Here at Manhattan GRE, we receive a lot of Grad School jokes, most of which are fairly lackluster.  However, we recently came across this LCD Soundsystem parody video, Grad School, I Love You (But You’re Bringing Me Down).  Something about this video drew us in, so we decided to share it with you.

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Cheesy Mnemonics for GRE Vocab: Insouciant

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Mnemonics or mnemonic devices are memory tricks to help us remember things like vocabulary words (here’s a post about the word mnemonic).

However, many mnemonics are pretty cheesy — often involving the kind of jokes some people call “groaners.” For instance…

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How To Read A Reading Comp Passage

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How to read? Surely, we all know how to read already! Right?

It turns out that the best way to read a passage on a standardized test is not the best way to read in the real world. So before I say anything else, I want to say this: use what we’re about to discuss for the GRE only. Don’t read this way once you actually get to grad school!
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Argument Structure Passages: Issues in Causality

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Credit: XKCD

To succeed at Argument Structure Passages on the GRE — short “Reading Comp” passages that are really logic problems — it helps to know a bit about the study of logic, because most mistakes in logic have been made many times before, even over thousands of years.

Many of the logical mistakes made on the GRE are really just the same logical mistakes Aristotle (the founder of the study of logic) complained about in the 4th century, B.C.

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The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – February 26th, 2012

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

Identical blocks are stacked in rows to create a tower 24 rows tall. If the top row of the tower consists of four blocks, and each row below the top row consists of eight more blocks than the row directly above it, how many blocks are in the entire tower?

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Vocabulary in The Arizona Republican Presidential Debate

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As a Manhattan GRE employee I tend to see GRE vocabulary everywhere.  When I’m reading a book, or watching TV, or listening to music, GRE vocabulary words just jump out at me.  It is sort of like in the movie They Live when Rowdy Roddy Piper puts on his magic sunglasses and suddenly all of the writing in advertisements is changed to the word OBEY… except for me everything would be saying ACCEDE

Just last night, during the Republican Presidential Debate in Arizona, I heard the candidates use a few great GRE vocabulary words.  While politicians will often use simple language in an attempt to reach the broadest possible segment of the electorate, last night’s candidates didn’t hesitate to throw in a few obscure talking points.

At different points in last night’s debate, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum each used the word feckless.  Here is Romney’s quote:

Romney: We have very bad news that’s come from the Middle East over the past several months, a lot of it in part because of the feckless leadership of our President.

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Flashcard Sneak Peek: Don’t Be a Sapskull?

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Take a sneak peek into Manhattan Prep’s 500 Essential Words and 500 Advanced Words GRE flashcard sets!

When writing these cards, we wanted to make sure that everyone could get something out of every card — even if you already know the word on the front. Sap is one of those strange words that hardly anyone ever thinks to look up, but that actually has far more definitions than you’d think. Check it out:

Want to adopt 1,000 new flashcards? Visit our store here.

Japanese Multiplication Trick, and What It Has to Do With the GRE

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//www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-P5RGdjICo

Watch this silent video for a new (to most of us) visual way to multiply!

What does this have to do with the GRE? Note that the 3 at right (which ended up in the ones place) was completed before any of the “big” numbers at left. That is, we didn’t need to know what our answer started with to know what our answer ended with.

Regardless of the method of multiplication you use (even if that “method” is a calculator), you will want to remember this very important principle for the GRE:
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