Articles written by

The Spookiest Parts of the LSAT

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - The Spookiest Parts of the LSAT by Patrick Tyrrell

If you’re a new trick-or-treater to the neighborhood, you have no strategy but to try every house. However, once you’ve lived there a few years, you’ve been around the block (literally). You know your different neighbors’ tendencies. You know what kind of candy they’re likely to give out. You know which houses to avoid:
Read more

On the LSAT, Do Sweat the Small Stuff

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - On the LSAT, Do Sweat the Small Stuff by Patrick Tyrrell

If only my readers were old enough to know the plot of the original 1984 Karate Kid movie, or if only I were young enough to know whether the 2010 Jaden Smith reboot had the same plot… Read more

LSAT Sufficient Assumption Questions: Be the D.A. for the Day!

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - LSAT Sufficient Assumption Questions: Be the D.A. for the Day! by Patrick Tyrrell

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Congratulations, you are the District Attorney… til about 5:45 or 6:00 p.m. Thanks to a new law that voters moronically passed via referendum last April, the role of District Attorney will cycle through local citizens, much as it does with jury duty. Today, it’s your turn to try to win some convictions. Read more

Logical Reasoning Flaw Questions in the News

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Logical Reasoning Flaw Questions in the News by Patrick Tyrrell

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


1/6 of our questions in Logical Reasoning are Flaw questions, and about 45-50% of the answer choices in Logical Reasoning Flaw questions (over the past ten tests) refer to one of these 10 Famous Flaws: Read more

Right Brain vs. Left Brain: How to Train for the LSAT

by

Blog-6-17-2015We’ve all heard people referred to as left- or right-brained. Those left-brained thinkers are highly mathematical, logical, and literal. Think Spock, Stephen Hawking, and the Terminators. Their creative brethren, the right-brainers, are more impressionistic, holistic, and intuitive. Think Jimi Hendrix, Stephen Colbert, and Jackson Pollock.

What does this have to do with the LSAT? I’m glad you asked, rhetorical device.

Almost everyone relies more heavily on one of these two types of thinking. Working with students, we’ll often see someone who is over-diagramming, putting a huge focus on formal logic. This student feels most comfortable deriving solutions. She wants the answer to be provable, always.

On the other hand, we’ve also had students who lament, “I’m terrible at Games, but I’m okay with Reading Comp. I hate using conditional logic in LR.” This right-brained student is mainly getting a feel for what was said and picking an answer that gels well and seems relevant.

Which one are you? Take a few minutes to think about it. When faced with a decision, do you make a Pros/Cons list (left-brain), or do you rely on your gut (right-brain)?

Some people think that a right-brain person is in trouble on left-brain questions, and vice versa. But that’s not the case. In reality, everyone has abilities (although at different levels) in both types of thinking. What is important is learning how to develop your weak area and then applying both sides of your brain to the LSAT. Weird, right? You’ll have to think if you want to be a lawyer.

But what can you do to develop the “weaker” side of your brain?

Read more