Articles published in LSAT Scores

How Law Schools Evaluate Multiple LSAT Scores

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - How Law Schools Evaluate Multiple LSAT Scores by Stratus Admissions Counseling

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


You’ve just received your LSAT scores. Perhaps you’re happy with your results after having taken the test multiple times, or you are not thrilled with your initial score and are considering a retake. How law schools assess multiple LSAT scores varies. Here are three things to consider when contemplating a retake. Read more

LSAT Update, Harvard GRE Update, and More!

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - LSAT Update, Harvard GRE Update, and More! by Matt Shinners

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Phew, a lot has been going on in the LSAT world recently. Let’s take a look at everything and how it should impact your prep and application timeline. Read more

Introducing THE BRIEF—Your Free LSAT Email Series!

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Introducing THE BRIEF—Your Free LSAT Email Series! by Manhattan Prep

We here at Manhattan Prep are excited to announce the launch of a brand new product—THE BRIEF!

THE BRIEF is a comprehensive LSAT email series/study plan. Served straight to your inbox, you decide the frequency of lessons. Every other day, once a day, or twice a day, you’ll receive a chapter covering an LSAT topic, assignments to complete, and outside prep resources to use. By the time you’ve finished the series, you’ll have learned all concepts on the exam through over 200 pages of material, and then practiced them extensively through dozens of assignments.

The best part? It’s completely free. Read more

To Cancel or Not to Cancel Your LSAT Score: When to Press the Big Red Button

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - To Cancel or Not to Cancel Your LSAT Score: When to Press the Big Red Button by Ben Rashkovich

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Some people walk out of their test centers on LSAT day all smiles and good cheer, ready to enjoy their study-free day.

Some people. Read more

You Just Took the June LSAT. Should You Cancel Your Score?

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - You just took the June LSAT. Should You Cancel Your Score? by Matt ShinnersLearning science has come a long way in recent years, and we’ve been learning with it. We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


The June 2016 LSAT is now in the past.

Kind of. Read more

What is a Good LSAT Score?

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what's-a-good-lsat-score

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Law schools consider LSAT scores among several factors in determining admission. A student’s academic record is always going to be an important factor. However, the LSAT tends to be more important than GPA because every law school applicant must take the LSAT and it is scored uniformly across all applicants, whereas a particular GPA at one college may not represent the same level of academic achievement as the same GPA at another college.

LSAT scores range from 120-180, with 120 being the lowest possible score and a 180 LSAT score being the highest. The “raw” LSAT score is based on the number of questions answered correctly. Each LSAT will typically have 100 to 103 questions, with each question being worth 1 point (all are multiple-choice). Accordingly, the raw LSAT score is between 0 and 100 to 103. LSAT raw scores are converted to an LSAT final score that ranges from 120 to 180. The LSAC also determines a percentile rank for each LSAT score, showing the percentage of test takers scoring below a test score. Only 4 of the 5 multiple-choice sections count toward the LSAT test score (the fifth is experimental). The essay section is not scored. There is no deduction for blank or incorrect answers. Each question in the various test sections is weighed equally.

A good LSAT score is a score that would likely be acceptable by the majority of law schools. The average LSAT score is 150 and puts the student in the 50th percentile. Generally, a score of about 160 is acceptable to most law schools. However, for the top-tiered law schools, the LSAT score must be at least 171, or in the 98th percentile, for the student’s application to be competitive.

After taking the LSAT once, the student who does not feel his or her LSAT score was good enough may be tempted to retake the test to improve the score and ultimately improve his or her chances of being accepted into the desired law school. Students are permitted to take the LSAT up to three times in a two-year period. Before spending the time and money on preparing for and retaking the LSAT, it is important to note that according to the LSAC statistics, students who retake the exam typically do not enjoy a significantly-improved performance. For example, for 2010-2011 LSAT re-takers who originally scored 145, 65.1% percent saw a score increase, but the increase was on average only 2.4 points, while 28.2% of these re-takers had a decrease in score. Furthermore, different schools take different approaches as to how they factor multiple test scores. Some schools will consider the average LSAT score, while others consider just the highest LSAT score.

Even for the most selective, top-tier law schools, there are cases where a relatively poor showing on the LSAT may be outweighed by an academic record that makes a clear case for the student’s ability to thrive in a rigorous academic environment. Law schools will also consider the applicant’s personal statement, recommendations, and work experience. Each of these items, including the LSAT, is viewed in the context of the entire application package. For one applicant the LSAT may be heavily weighed, while for another student, the importance of the LSAT is decreased because of details provided in the personal statement in combination with stellar grades. That said, LSAT remains critical for the vast majority of applicants barring extraordinary extenuating circumstances. 📝


Don’t forget that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free. We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Manhattan Prep LSAT Instructor Mary Richter

Mary Richter is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in New York City. Mary has degrees from Yale Law School and Duke. She has over 10 years of experience teaching the LSAT after scoring in the 99th percentile on the test. She is always thrilled to see students reach beyond their target scores. At Yale, she co-directed the school’s Domestic Violence Clinic for two years. After graduating, she became an associate at Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP in New York City, where she was also the firm’s pro bono coordinator. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Slate, and more. Check out Mary’s upcoming classes here.

The February LSAT: Why it’s Good, Why it’s Bad, Why it’s Not as Ugly as You May Think

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Manhattan Prep LSAT - The February LSAT: Why It's Good, Why It's Bad, Why It's Not as Ugly as You May ThinkWe incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


I know what you’re thinking: aren’t all LSATs a pain in the neck? Touchè—you got me there—but the February LSAT can be a particularly baffling proposition for law school hopefuls. There are several reasons for this… Read more