Articles published in Reading Comprehension

A Guide to Note-Taking on the LSAT

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - A Guide to Note-Taking on the LSAT by Ally Bell

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


If you, like me, prefer to take your LSAT studying poolside during these hot summer days, here’s an analogy that you’ll relate to: Note-taking on the LSAT is like applying sunscreen. Like sunscreen, if you use too many notes on certain parts of the LSAT, you may be left with foolish-looking marks that didn’t end up being especially useful; but use too little, and the test will scorch you just like the sun. Also like sunscreen, there’s a time and place for notes on the LSAT. Unless you’re hanging at a nudist pool, you probably don’t need sunscreen literally everywhere, nor do you need notes everywhere on the LSAT. Unfortunately, figuring out sunscreen is generally a lot simpler than figuring out note-taking on the LSAT. Since this is an issue many of my students grapple with in all phases of their preparation, here are a few guidelines, and here’s hoping you’re reading them by the pool. Read more

Drop the Phone and Pick Up Some Books!

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Drop the Phone and Pick Up Some Books! by Ben Rashkovich

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Last month, I wrote about how diving into Shakespeare can help you improve your LSAT Reading Comprehension score, by forcing you to “read for the scale.” (If you’re not sure what that means, check out the article!)

While the scale is important in every passage you’ll tackle—since the LSAT is, of course, a test about arguments—you shouldn’t neglect the fundamentals of Reading Comprehension as a general test section. It’s on just about every standardized test, from the SATs and ACTs to the LSATs and MCATs… And for good reason.   

So, LSAT-specific Reading Comprehension tips aside, how can you get better at the basics?

One answer: Read more books! Read more

Reading for the LSAT…in Only 35 Minutes!

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Reading for the LSAT ...in Only 35 Minutes! by Daniel Fogel

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Reading for the LSAT

While Logical Reasoning and Logic Games offer new challenges for almost all LSAT students, Reading Comprehension provides a more familiar task. This is both a blessing and a curse: answering questions about a passage may feel more comfortable than identifying a flaw in an argument; however, this familiarity leads students to bring a set of presumptions to RC that doesn’t translate to success on the LSAT. This often manifests in not only reduced accuracy, but also reduced speed. Read more

Challenging Vocabulary on the LSAT

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Challenging Vocabulary on the LSAT by Allison Bell

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


No matter who you are and what kind of spelling bees you’ve won, you’re likely to encounter some new, challenging vocabulary on the LSAT. The test encompasses such a broad range of topics, from the feeding habits of dung beetles to Greek philosophy, that you’re bound to encounter a passage where it feels like you’re reading a foreign language. As a result, students often ask me what type of vocabulary they should study to prepare for the LSAT. Read more

Want to Improve Your LSAT Reading Comprehension Score? Try Shakespeare

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Want to Improve Your LSAT Reading Comprehension Score? Try Shakespeare by Ben Rashkovich

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


To many people I’ve encountered studying for the LSAT, the Reading Comprehension section is the toughest to study for. How do you get better at reading, after all?

But as you might guess, LSAT Reading Comprehension involves a lot more than just reading and understanding passages. You’re actually being tested on your logical analysis, the speed and efficiency of your close reading, and your ability to extrapolate from facts you’re given.

Which means it’s absolutely something you can improve. Read more

Announcing Free LSAT Crunch Time Workshops! Register Now!

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Free LSAT Crunch Time Workshops! Get Your Last-Minute Prep On

The September 2016 LSAT is on the 24th. It’s officially Crunch Time. That’s why we’ve put together a series of three free LSAT Crunch Time Workshops to help you brush up on LSAT Strategy, Logical Reasoning, Logic Games, and Reading Comprehension leading up to the test.

Here’s the slate: Read more

Taking the September 2016 LSAT? Matt and Mary Have Some Study Advice for You

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Closer Reading: The Stories Behind LSAT RC Passages and LR Questions – PrepTest 56, Section 4, Passage 1

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Stories Behind the LSAT: Amos Tutola by Matt ShninersUnder the time constraints of the LSAT, you won’t have time to appreciate some of the great content in the Reading Comprehension passages and Logical Reasoning questions. In this blog series, we’re slowing things down to tell some of the most interesting stories from the test and explain how they can aid in your LSAT prep.


Anyone who took PrepTest 56 learned a little about Amos Tutuola and his folktales (not novels), as the author classified them, in the reading comprehension questions of section 4, passage 1. He wrote in the African oral tradition, according to the passage, and his works should be viewed through that lens.

But what else can we learn about the man? Read more

Closer Reading: The Stories Behind RC Passages and LR Questions – PrepTest 37, Section 1, Passage 3

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Stories Behind the Test: Ralph Ellison by Matt ShinnersUnder the time constraints of the LSAT, you won’t have time to appreciate some of the great content in the Reading Comprehension passages and Logical Reasoning questions. In this blog series, we’re slowing things down to tell some of the most interesting stories from the test and explain how they can aid in your LSAT prep.


Ralph Ellison and his most famous novel, The Invisible Man, featured prominently in passage 3 of PrepTest 37’s Reading Comprehension section, which suggests the writers of the LSAT felt that the average reader wouldn’t know much about him. After all, they try to pick more obscure subjects to avoid giving anyone an advantage. Hopefully, however, this post makes him slightly more visible to the average LSAT prepper! Read more

I’m in Love with the June 2007 LSAT and I Need to Tell You All About It! – Part 5

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - I'm in Love with the June 2007 LSAT and I Need to Tell You All About It - Part 5 by Chris GentryThis is a continuation of a series of posts exploring the June 2007 LSAT in detail. My goal is to demonstrate where hidden opportunities lie; then, using these analyses as a template, you can find those hidden opportunities in other practice tests. And, of course, find them on test day! Why the June 2007 LSAT? Because this is the LSAT all potential test takers can freely access; this is where most test takers probably begin their prep. And I want to give you some help from the ground up, so to speak!


So, we’ve covered some basics in LR and RC. In LR, we looked at some problems that most test takers skip, and why they shouldn’t. In later posts, we examined speed in LR and in RC. If you haven’t read any of those previous posts, you can start at Part 1.

But we haven’t talked about LG yet.

 Why leave LG for last? Read more