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eybrj2
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From the Manhattan SC book 5th edition

by eybrj2 Mon Jun 11, 2012 5:44 am

On page 267,

Having been shown into the office, Julia waited for the dentists to arrive.


Correct.
The whole phrase that precedes the comma functions as a participial phrase modifying the verb waited.

How the phrase modify the verb?
Doesn't it modofy Julia?


The words "having been shown" are strongly analgous to a verb in the past perfect tense.

How?? I don't understand this explanation.
ashishpanday
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Re: From the Manhattan SC book 5th edition

by ashishpanday Tue Jun 12, 2012 2:58 am

Please keep aside sentence structure and focus on meaning

"having been + past participle"

passive structure used in participle clauses as an alternative to a since-clause:

1. "Having seen an accident ahead, I stopped my car."
Meaning I noticed that there had been an accident ahead and stopped my car.
2. Seeing an accident ahead, I stopped my car.

Meaning When I saw the accident ahead, I stopped my car.

Now read this sentence

"Having been unemployed for over two years, I found it difficult to get work."

"Having been shown into the office, Julia waited for the dentists to arrive."

see link http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learn ... v305.shtml

Hope It is clear to you.
jlucero
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Re: From the Manhattan SC book 5th edition

by jlucero Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:58 pm

Excellent explanation and reference point. I'll also add this:

"Having been shown into the office" doesn't really describe Julia. I wouldn't saying, here's my friend Julia, she's been having been shown into the office. It's more of a temporal description. When did Julia wait for the dentist? After she'd been shown into the office.
Joe Lucero
Manhattan GMAT Instructor