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when to use compared with and compared to

by Guest Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:47 pm

I am confused on when to use
compared with and compared to
GK
 
 

by GK Fri Jan 11, 2008 4:41 am

I use the following approach:

Use 'compare to' when comparing things which are not similar.
Eg: He compared her to a summer sun. (Comparison is between a person and the sun)

Use 'compare with' when comparing similar things.
Eg: He compared the forged signature with the original one. (Comparison is between two signatures).

I hope that helps.
Hei
 
 

by Hei Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:01 pm

Aaron
 
 

frustrated with Question Explanations

by Aaron Sun Dec 07, 2008 4:49 pm

Yea, So I follow the logic of the above example and agree...However, I think MGMAT's explanations are somewhats only partially complete..for instance


Free MGMAT EXAM: "Subtropical Cyclone Question"

When describing the similarities between unlike things, the idiom "compare to" is used. When describing the differences between like things, the idiom "compare with" is used. In this sentence, differences between two like things, a tropical cyclone systems and subtropical cyclone systems, are discussed. Therefore, the idiom "in comparison with" is the correct choice.


MGMAT CAT I EXAM: "TV and Test Scores"

There are three problems in the original sentence. First, the comparison is highlighting a difference in the effect of television on children, as measured by test scores. The original sentence uses the idiom "compared to," but the correct idiom for highlighting differences is "compared with."

Reading closely, they're not contradictory. However, the 2nd explanation NEEDS to say "highlighting differences between two like things". Otherwise, the explanation is as cryptic as the question!!!
JonathanSchneider
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by JonathanSchneider Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:25 pm

I agree with the rules posted on the link above.
GK, I actually disagree with the way you described this mater, so you may want to look into it. You seem to be deciding on your own whether or not the items being compared are similar. This is NOT the way you want to determine similarity. Notice that by using the word "compare" at all, we are setting things up as being alike somehow. The important decision that we must make is whether the author intends to compare or contrast these two like things. Notice that the word "compare" can really mean "show two like things as being similar" or "show two like things as being dissimilar in some other way." AKA, "compare" can really mean compare or contrast. When we wish to show two like things as similar, we use "compare to." When we wish to shoe them as dissimilar, we use "compare with."

The easy mnemonic fo this is: "To for Together."
goelmohit2002
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Re:

by goelmohit2002 Fri Aug 07, 2009 1:02 pm

JonathanSchneider wrote:I agree with the rules posted on the link above.
GK, I actually disagree with the way you described this mater, so you may want to look into it. You seem to be deciding on your own whether or not the items being compared are similar. This is NOT the way you want to determine similarity. Notice that by using the word "compare" at all, we are setting things up as being alike somehow. The important decision that we must make is whether the author intends to compare or contrast these two like things. Notice that the word "compare" can really mean "show two like things as being similar" or "show two like things as being dissimilar in some other way." AKA, "compare" can really mean compare or contrast. When we wish to show two like things as similar, we use "compare to." When we wish to shoe them as dissimilar, we use "compare with."

The easy mnemonic fo this is: "To for Together."


Hi Jonathan,

But Manhattan SC guide 4th edition says that GMAT does not distinguish between compared to/compared with...then why this is the case here ?

Thanks
Mohit
RonPurewal
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Re: when to use compared with and compared to

by RonPurewal Wed Sep 23, 2009 5:56 am

hi -

we've done some research on this topic, and we have actually reversed our position from that in the earlier editions of the strategy guides.

from this point onward, DO NOT WORRY ABOUT DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN "COMPARE TO" AND "COMPARE WITH".
we have reviewed the many official problems available to us, and this distinction has never been the basis for ANY elimination.

there are many, many problems in which the choices contain both "compare to" and "compare with", but none of them require any solid distinction between the two.
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