Q12

 
NicholasR290
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Q12

by NicholasR290 Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:08 am

Having a bit of trouble here - any guidance?
 
JamieY105
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Re: Q12

by JamieY105 Tue Sep 04, 2018 4:22 pm

D is very clearly supported in lines 27-29, "expertise appears to change... our very perception of entities in that area".

(A) This unsubstantiated regarding experts. This is what was said about children.
(B) Completely out of scope.
(C) I think C is tricky and the reason I think it may be wrong is that although the passage does express that experts' thinking does avail one to failure to recognize errors; I think it is difficult to claim that the position necessarily implies that experts have an "increased tendency" to recognize errors in judgments. The issue stands in the comparative nature of this answer choice.
(E) This is opposite of what the passage says.
 
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Re: Q12

by TedA670 Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:43 am

I feel like answer (C) is wrong because it uses the word "ignore" which implies a conscious effort, whereas the passage only mentions "fail to notice" (line 37) which I guess means unintentionally. In retrospect, (D) is indeed a better choice considering the passage actually states "become able to see and to grasp these entities and their relations directly" (line 30-31) although I missed this during the practice test.
 
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Re: Q12

by TiffanyH940 Mon Nov 05, 2018 12:14 am

I picked C but later realized it's wrong even though initially I thought C is supported by line 38-41.

There's a distinction between "ignore judgement errors within certain field" and "thinking there's no way ourselves can be wrong in identification of our own thoughts".

The former is misjudge certain field of study or something external, while the later is misjudge ourselves to be wrong about our own thoughts.