Articles published in Law School

Harvard Law School Now Accepts the GRE for Admission

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Harvard Law School Accepts GRE in Addition to LSAT - Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog

You read that right.  Read more

Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Lose the Exclamation Points

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Lose the Exclamation Points by jdMission

In this series, a jdMission Senior Consultant reviews real law school personal statements. What’s working well? What’s not? If it were his/her essay, what would be changed? Find out!


Note: To maintain the integrity and authenticity of this project, we have not edited the law school personal statements, though any identifying names and details have been changed or removed. Any grammatical errors that appear in the essays belong to the candidates and illustrate the importance of having someone (or multiple someones) proofread your work.

Personal Statement

I never actually got to be Brutus, at least not on game day. But I was the next best thing. I actually got to spend every game day on the sidelines of Horseshoe Stadium, which was a childhood dream, and I got to make sure that Mike, who played Brutus, had enough water and didn’t fall over with the enormous weight of that giant head. (Trust me. On a hot autumn day after two hours, it’s hard to keep upright.)
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Telling Your Story: Beginnings Are Boring

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Telling Your Story: Beginnings Are Boring by jdMission

A personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your law school personal statement.


You walk into a bookstore to browse, pick up a book with an interesting title and open it to the first page. It begins, “I was born on a sunny day in Indiana in 1955.” Do you keep reading? If you are like me, probably not. I know better than to overvalue book covers, but I do judge most books by their first lines.

A general principle of storytelling is that too much exposition or background before the action starts is a guaranteed way to lose readers. The same idea can make your law school personal statement stronger, hooking a reader from the beginning rather than the middle. (Let’s be honest, an admissions officer may not even make it to the middle, depending on the strength of your application.) Read more

Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Vary Your Sentence Length

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Vary Your Sentence Length by jdMission

In this series, a jdMission Senior Consultant reviews real law school personal statements. What’s working well? What’s not? If it were his/her essay, what would be changed? Find out!


Note: To maintain the integrity and authenticity of this project, we have not edited the personal statements, though any identifying names and details have been changed or removed. Any grammatical errors that appear in the essays belong to the candidates and illustrate of the importance of having someone (or multiple someones) proofread your work. Read more

The Law School Rolling Admissions Cycle, Explained

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - The Law School Rolling Admissions Cycle, Explained by Stratus Admissions Counseling

How does the rolling admissions cycle differ from a typical deadline cycle? Our newest partner, premiere admissions counseling firm Stratus Admissions Counselingwants to help make this confusing process crystal clear for you. To that end, they’ve outlined some crucial information about the rolling admissions cycle.


An uncommon and often confusing feature of the law school admissions process is that it uses a rolling admissions cycle. In this article, we’ll explore the rolling admissions cycle that law schools use and provide tips on how to navigate the process to your advantage.

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What You Need to Know About Law School Application Deadlines

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - What You Need to Know About Law School Application Deadlines by Stratus Admissions Counseling

Having trouble decoding a law school’s different deadlines? Our newest partner, premiere admissions counseling firm Stratus Admissions Counselingwants to help make this confusing process crystal clear for you. To that end, they’ve outlined some crucial information about application deadlines.


Because law schools use a rolling admissions cycle, it is often daunting to figure out each law school application deadlines, if they have one at all, and what one should do if the stated deadline has passed. The information that follows is intended to provide general guidance on deadlines and how to interpret them. As with many aspects of the law school admissions process, the treatment of law school application deadlines varies greatly from school to school, so always check with the schools themselves if you have any questions about their deadlines.

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Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Don’t Fizzle at the End

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Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Don't Fizzle at the End - Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog BannerIn this series, a jdMission Senior Consultant reviews real law school personal statements. What’s working well? What’s not? If it were his/her essay, what would be changed? Find out!


Note: Although there are subtle differences in what each school asks for in a personal statement, in general the personal statement is a straightforward essay question that asks you to explain to the admissions committee why you are applying to law school. To maintain the integrity and authenticity of this project, we have not edited the personal statements. Any grammatical errors that appear in the essays belong to the candidates and illustrate the importance of having someone (or multiple someones) proofread your work. The names of identifying individuals and organizations have been changed for privacy reasons. Sign up for your own Free Personal Statement Review!

The Statement

In the aftermath of the Parker City tornado in the spring of 2008, an urgent call went out at 3PM from a first aid station in that beleaguered town to Grandview Hospital in Des Moines, where I was working as an EMT. A physician’s presence was desperately needed that very afternoon. I was not a physician, but I had been extensively trained in emergency medical care. If no one else could heed the call, I knew I would take it. Read more

Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Reveal Something Meaningful

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Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Reveal Something Meaningful - Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog BannerIn this series, a jdMission Senior Consultant reviews real law school personal statements. What’s working well? What’s not? If it were his/her essay, what would be changed? Find out!


Note: Although there are subtle differences in what each school asks for in a personal statement, in general the personal statement is a straightforward essay question that asks you to explain to the admissions committee why you are applying to law school. To maintain the integrity and authenticity of this project, we have not edited the personal statements. Any grammatical errors that appear in the essays belong to the candidates and illustrate the importance of having someone (or multiple someones) proofread your work. The names of identifying individuals and organizations have been changed for privacy reasons. Sign up for your own Free Personal Statement Review!

The Statement

My name is Min-Jae but I go by MJ. I am not trying to Americanize my Korean roots with this nickname. Read more

Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Don’t Just Tell Your Story; Tell What it Means

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - jdMission 2 - Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Don't Just Tell Your Story; Tell What it MeansIn this series, a jdMission Senior Consultant reviews real law school personal statements. What’s working well? What’s not? If it were his/her essay, what would be changed? Find out!

Note: Although there are subtle differences in what each school asks for in a personal statement, in general the personal statement is a straightforward essay question that asks you to explain to the admissions committee why you are applying to law school. To maintain the integrity and authenticity of this project, we have not edited the personal statements. Any grammatical errors that appear in the essays belong to the candidates and illustrate the importance of having someone (or multiple someones) proofread your work. The names of identifying individuals and organizations have been changed for privacy reasons. Sign up for your own Free Personal Statement Review!


The Statement

Suddenly, there I was, twenty-three-years old and standing in line at CVS with a giant, conspicuous box of adult diapers. When I got to the check out, the pretty blond behind the cash register looked at me quizzically. “For my grandma,” I said. Read more

Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Your Story is only as Good as It’s Told

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - jdMission 1 - Real Law School Personal Statements Reviewed: Your Story is only as Good as It's Told

In this series, a jdMission Senior Consultant reviews real law school personal statements. What’s working well? What’s not? If it were his/her essay, what would be changed? Find out!

Note: Although there are subtle differences in what each school asks for in a personal statement, in general the personal statement is a straightforward essay question that asks you to explain to the admissions committee why you are applying to law school. To maintain the integrity and authenticity of this project, we have not edited the personal statements. Any grammatical errors that appear in the essays belong to the candidates and illustrate the importance of having someone (or multiple someones) proofread your work. The names of identifying individuals and organizations have been changed for privacy reasons. Sign up for your own Free Personal Statement Review!


The Statement

After I graduated from [Undergraduate College], I was given [a fellowship] to teach English in rural China. The January before I left, I attended a three-day retreat with other prospective fellows. There were about half a dozen of us, young leftist [students] desperate to travel, seeking adventure and an opportunity to change the world. It was for this reason that the director of the program explained the following: Read more