Articles tagged "LSAT explanations"

LSAT Questions, Answers, and Explanations


Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - LSAT Questions, Answers, and Explanations

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Hey! You there—are you looking for explanations to LSAT questions? We’ve got the goods. Browse our forum explanation bank, read explanations, and, if you’d like, join in the discussion—maybe even add your own two cents! While you’re at it, you might as well go ahead and bookmark this invaluable page now. Read more

June 2007 LSAT Video Explanations


We’re very excited to announce that we have posted video explanations for the June 2007 LSAT logic games.  You can see them here: // or on You Tube – //  Dan and Mike put a lot of time into coming up with truly useful recordings.  Granted, we’re much more about teaching — i.e. making students think — than presenting solutions, but when you’re studying, it’s obviously useful to see how someone else solved a game (particularly how one of our super nerdy curriculum developers did it).  If you’d like to see explanations for the entire game, check that out on our forums: //

For our students, we’re developing video explanations for some of the toughest games in our course HW.  Unfortunately, we have to restrict those to our students in order to respect LSAC’s copyrights.

The June 2007 LSAT is a great way to get your feet wet with the LSAT.  However, make sure you take it under timed conditions!  If you’d like to get a copy, as well as some of our resources associated with that test (including a spreadsheet that will analyze your answers), take a look here: //

Have fun and good luck!

LSAT Answers and Explanations


As an LSAT teacher you end up explaining a lot of LSAT questions.  We’ve actually designed our forums to focus on providing an easily searched bank of explanations to any LSAT problem – // .  (We figured we’d save a few trees by not printing an entire book of them, plus then all those studying on their own have a place to go.)   I will say, however, that I’m always a bit cautious when I find a student asking for the explanations for an entire test.  I always wonder – and sometimes ask – whether the student has reviewed the work on his own first.  The best students first review the test themselves.  A couple of tips on reviewing your work:

1. Mark which answers you can easily eliminate and which ones are tempting.

2. Note any problem that you find difficult, find yourself guessing on, or that you find takes too long.

3. When you review your work, review all the questions you answered incorrectly, and all those you noted above (see #2).

4. For the questions you review, ask yourself the following:
– Do I understand the question (this includes the stem and the stimulus, passage, scenario, etc.)?
– Why is the correct answer right?
– Why is each wrong answer wrong?
– How could I have approached this question differently?  Is there a more efficient manner?  Is there a more intuitive approach? Read more