Manhattan Prep GRE Blog

Vocab in the Classics: To the Immortal Memory of the Halibut

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I came across 18th century poet William Cowper in the Slate article “Why are William Cowper’s poems so witty?

For instance, this one (source):
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The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – January 9th, 2012

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

Per Serving of: Calories Cost
Snack A 200 $1.70
Snack B 350 $0.60

Choosing from the snacks in the table above, a group consumes 3250 calories of snacks that cost a total of $11.

Quantity A Quantity B
The number of servings of Snack A the group consumed 4

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Friday Links

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Here is what happened in the world of the GRE this week…

Have a great weekend, everybody!

Three Reasons to Start Your GRE Studies in January

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So, you made your New Year’s resolutions based on the fact that you are currently reading a GRE blog, I’m guessing that one of yours involved applying to graduate school. Let me be the first to say, excellent decision! Now what do you do?

I’ve looked at a number of online Graduate School Application Timelines, from a number of different sources, and one thing that nearly every timeline suggests, is a starting date that falls between May and September BUT WAIT! Don’t stop reading.

Yes, you could spend the next five months slogging through your Netflix instant queue waiting for those calendars to start, and you would still be able to complete you applications. However, I would recommend starting now by knocking out the GRE, and here is why.

1. Less to worry about in the fall

My biggest complaint about timelines that suggest a May-September start date is that they place Take the GRE on a single day in October. Most people, however, will spend more than one day on the GRE. Here at Manhattan GRE we recommend that students spend roughly three months on their preparation, but even students with a modest study plan will usually set aside two or three weeks to take some GRE practice tests and review their areas of weakness. Now, imagine these 2-10 weeks overlapping with the time you spend writing personals statements, requesting letters of recommendation, and refining your application. It sounds needlessly overwhelming.

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A Classic “Donut” Problem

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This comic from XKCD is not only hilarious, but presents a remarkably GRE-like scenario:

So, here’s a question — what is the area of the “donut” shape in which the man in the comic is legally permitted to move?

Answer the question yourself before clicking “More.”

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The Math Beast Challenge Problem of the Week – January 2nd, 2012

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Math BeastEach week, we post a new Challenge Problem for you to attempt. If you submit the correct answer, you will be entered into that week’s drawing for two free Manhattan Prep GRE Strategy Guides.

challenge problem image 1

challenge problem image 2

The pharmaceutical division’s interest on debt expense is 4 times that of the chemical division. What percent of the chemical division’s payroll expense is the pharmaceutical division’s payroll expense, rounded to the nearest whole percent?

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The New ETS Diagnostic Service, and Other Ways to Get Personalized Feedback

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You may not be aware of the new GRE Diagnostic Service, available to any test takers who have already taken the Revised exam. Did you know that you can actually see how many questions you missed, the difficulty level of each question, how long you spent on each question, and the categories of the problems you missed? (You can’t see the actual questions, though).

Of course, this information is mainly helpful to those who have taken the real exam and intend to take it again. Here’s a screenshot of a small portion of my results:

Of course, we all want to avoid having to retake the real exam. One way to do that is to make sure you are practicing with serious computer-based practice exams. Studying on paper, without time limits, is just not the same!
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Flashcard Sneak Peek: OMG, “Exponents” Are In Math AND Verbal!

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Take a sneak peek into Manhattan Prep’s 500 Essential Words and 500 Advanced Words GRE flashcard sets!

Did you know that an “exponent” isn’t just the power to which we raise a number? Check it out:

Want to adopt 1,000 new flashcards? Visit our store here.

Shock News! British education reformer dislikes testing, has excellent vocabulary

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Education reformer Charlotte Mason (1842-1923) had a few things to say about testing:

As to the manner of study, this is ruled by the style of questions set in a given subject; and Dry-as-dust wins the day because it is easier and fairer to give marks upon definite facts than upon mere ebullitions of fancy or genius.”

Ebullition might be a new word for you, but if you’ve taken a Manhattan GRE class, you certainly know the word ebullient, which means “overflowing with enthusiasm or excitement; exuberant,” or simply, “boiling.”
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Math in the Real World: Counting Problems

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The practical applications of math in the real world, from intrepid U.S. Post Office employee James Wu.

elevator

“This is a wall panel for an apartment building in Boston. It has five floors, and each floor has the same number of apartments. I have a package for #49–the buzzer doesn’t work very well, but they tell me to go up. What floor do I go to?”

Work out a solution before clicking “More”.

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