Articles published in PrepTests

Take Your LSAT Practice Exam Like This to Maximize Your Score

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Take Your Practice LSAT Like This to Maximize Your Score by Matt ShinnersIf you practice how you play, you’ll maximize your chances of success. We’re hosting a series of Free Proctored LSAT Practice Exams leading up to the June 2016 LSAT. Find one that works for you here.


There’s a time and a place to work on some LSAT problems in your pajamas, with the TV on in the background, your dog in your lap, and a pizza on the way. All of those comforts will make it a little easier to suffer through a series of questions (as long as you can stay focused). And, in fact, studies show that having an ever-changing mix of stimuli around, triggering different senses, is a great way to get your brain to retain information.

However, when it’s time to sit down and take a practice test, it’s time to get serious. Read more

I’m in love with the June 2007 LSAT and I Need to Tell You All About It! – Part 2

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Blog Banner for Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - I'm in Love with the 2007 LSAT and I Need to Tell You All About It by Chris GentryThis is a continuation of a series of posts exploring the June 2007 LSAT in detail. My goal is to demonstrate where hidden opportunities lie; then, using these analyses as a template, you can find those hidden opportunities in other practice tests. And, of course, find them on test day! Why the June 2007 LSAT? Because this is the LSAT all potential test takers can freely access; this is where most test takers probably begin their prep. And I want to give you some help from the ground up, so to speak!


Miss our previous post? Check it out here.

In our continued struggle for LSAT mastery, there are many vital considerations: Read more

I’m in love with the June 2007 LSAT (and can’t wait to tell you all about it)! Part 1

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - I'm in Love with the June 2007 LSAT and I Need to Tell You All About It by Chris GentryDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


This post will be the first of a series exploring the June 2007 LSAT in detail. Each post will examine a few questions from that test at a time. My goal is to demonstrate where hidden opportunities lie; then, using this analysis as a template, you can find those hidden opportunities in other practice tests. And, of course, find them on test day! Read more

You Just Got Your February LSAT Score. Here’s What to Do Next.

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - You Just Got Your February LSAT Score - Here's What to Do Next by Matt ShinnersDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


February scores came out this week, and your score was either lower than expected, higher than expected, or right where you expected it. Brilliant analysis, I know!

If it went as expected, or better than expected, and you’re happy with your score, stop reading! Go celebrate. Send in last-minute applications, or update ones you’ve already sent in.

If, however, it didn’t go as well as you had hoped, this article’s for you. Read more

Here’s Where to Start Your LSAT Prep

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blog-startlsatWhen you first begin preparing to take the LSAT, it certainly feels like there is a lot—too much—to take in. There are dozens of practice tests; dozens, if not hundreds, of websites; and dozens of strategy guides! Where do you begin?!?! Read more

You Derive Me Crazy: Inference Gut Check (LSAT Logic Games Series)

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Blog-Derive-Inference Gut CheckNo matter how good you get at Logic Games, finding those difficult inferences will always be a challenge! In our “You Derive Me Crazy” blog series, we’ll take a look at some of the higher-level inferences that repeat on the LSAT, ensuring that you have all the tools necessary to tackle anything the LSAT throws at you on test day. 🎓💼

Let’s talk about something that we haven’t really brought up before in this crazy, Britney Spears-inspired blog series:

Questions.
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You Derive Me Crazy: Numerical Distributions (LSAT Logic Games Series)

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LSAT_YDMC_Numerical Distributions_10_21_2015No matter how good you get at Logic Games, finding those difficult inferences will always be a challenge! In our “You Derive Me Crazy” blog series, we’ll take a look at some of the higher-level inferences that repeat on the LSAT, ensuring that you have all the tools necessary to tackle anything the LSAT throws at you on test day

Numbers – if you felt comfortable with them, you’d be taking the GMAT!

I kid. But many of my students do have an aversion to numbers that comes from years of focusing on  non-mathematical topics in their undergrad studies.

Unfortunately, some math will help you on certain logic games. Luckily, if you can add and subtract by one, you’re in good shape!

What am I talking about here? Read more

#MovieFailMondays: The Martian (or, How Movies Can Teach You About Logical Fallacies and Help You Ace the LSAT)

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Blog-MFM-TheMartianEach week, we analyze a movie that illustrates a logical fallacy you’ll find on the LSAT. Who said Netflix can’t help you study? 🎥📖

Since we covered Gravity a few weeks ago, we figured we should also cover its sequel, The Martian. Read more

PrepTests: Best Friend, or Worst Enemy?

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7-6-2015-PracticeTestsYou’ve done this, haven’t you? You’ve sat down at a piano or picked up a guitar and tried to play it. After a couple of notes, you think, “Hey, I sound great!” Then you try to play your favorite song and realize that you sound terrible.

Most of us lose interest pretty quickly at this point. Some people decide to take lessons. But imagine a beginner who just keeps trying to play Led Zeppelin’s Stairway to Heaven, or a concerto by Bach, over and over, day after day, hoping that some day she will get it right. She might eventually nail it, but any music teacher will tell you that this isn’t the best way to learn an instrument.

Without realizing it, this could be exactly how you’re trying to prepare for the LSAT. It’s common for people to make full PrepTests the main focus of their prep plan. If this describes you, and aren’t seeing much improvement, don’t be surprised.

Preparing for the LSAT is similar to learning a musical instrument. Playing a concerto or a killer guitar riff requires an array of fundamental skills that allow you to combine individual notes and chords into a beautiful and complex piece of music. To do well on the LSAT, you will also use an array of fundamental skills, like identifying the conclusion of an argument or finding the important inferences in a logic game, to get a beautiful score. You will first need to learn these individual skills, then perfect them through practice, before you can combine them effectively to answer the different types of questions you’ll see on the test.

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